Module 9 (Part C): Planning Lessons with Technology

What is your informed opinion about banning mobile phones and other digital devices in schools?

To ban mobile, digital devices in schools is to deny the future of 21st-century learning and contemporary education.

We have reached a point in the digital age where mobile technologies are ubiquitous, contributing to the rise of informal learning. Students can access information anytime, anywhere and the way they share, create and communicate has fundamentally changed. The ‘technology’ of mobile phones and digital devices has disappeared as they become more prevalent in our students lives. If we are to make education relevant, meaningful and authentic to student lives and develop students’ digital literacies as the literature and the Australian curriculum suggest, the learning must meet the students where they are (Honan, 2012; Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2013). And that is across the web, on mobile phones and digital devices according to the 2015 Australian Communications and Media Authority report.

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Module 9 (Part B): Planning Lessons with Technology

For those of you who have little, if any, experience planning lessons, what worries you the most about the process?

As a pre-service teacher with zero lesson planning experience, I worry that I am being seduced by the theory. I worry that my ideas and chosen frameworks will not translate into the classroom as well as they sound in the texts. This is because I am yet to complete the practical components of my degree and am due to commence my first curriculum method subject next session due to a mid-year enrolment. I am merely hypothesising what I think may be effective at this stage.

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Module 9 (Part A):Planning Lessons with Technology

Post your ideas about the TPACK framework. 

The TPACK framework suggests that for successful integration of technology in classroom practice to occur, there must be an overlap of technological, pedagogical and content knowledge (Mishra, 2014). Further to this, the context in which technology integration will be applied must also be considered. Frameworks such as TPACK provide an applicable way to bridge the gap between theory and practice when it comes to technology integration in classrooms and identifies what teachers need to know to integrate technology successfully (Koehler, Shin, & Mishra, 2012, p. 24).

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