Module 10: Classroom Technology and Collaboration

In what ways, will you be able to help your students collaborate using technology?

Collaborative problem solving and decision making is a key skill in my discipline area of History where students must learn to “communicate effectively, work in teams, negotiate, develop strategies to resolve issues and plan for action” (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2015). Gilbert and Hoepper (2017, p. 91) argue that collaborative learning is imperative to creating a thinking culture through talk (or chat) and supports learning habits and dispositions beyond subject-based skills. This is where technology affords collaborative learning across multiple disciplines by enabling deeper knowledge development through social interactions. I hope to utilise collaborative learning as a core component of pedagogy in my History and English classrooms in the following ways. Continue reading

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Module 9 (Part C): Planning Lessons with Technology

What is your informed opinion about banning mobile phones and other digital devices in schools?

To ban mobile, digital devices in schools is to deny the future of 21st-century learning and contemporary education.

We have reached a point in the digital age where mobile technologies are ubiquitous, contributing to the rise of informal learning. Students can access information anytime, anywhere and the way they share, create and communicate has fundamentally changed. The ‘technology’ of mobile phones and digital devices has disappeared as they become more prevalent in our students lives. If we are to make education relevant, meaningful and authentic to student lives and develop students’ digital literacies as the literature and the Australian curriculum suggest, the learning must meet the students where they are (Honan, 2012; Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2013). And that is across the web, on mobile phones and digital devices according to the 2015 Australian Communications and Media Authority report.

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Module 9 (Part B): Planning Lessons with Technology

For those of you who have little, if any, experience planning lessons, what worries you the most about the process?

As a pre-service teacher with zero lesson planning experience, I worry that I am being seduced by the theory. I worry that my ideas and chosen frameworks will not translate into the classroom as well as they sound in the texts. This is because I am yet to complete the practical components of my degree and am due to commence my first curriculum method subject next session due to a mid-year enrolment. I am merely hypothesising what I think may be effective at this stage.

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Module 9 (Part A):Planning Lessons with Technology

Post your ideas about the TPACK framework. 

The TPACK framework suggests that for successful integration of technology in classroom practice to occur, there must be an overlap of technological, pedagogical and content knowledge (Mishra, 2014). Further to this, the context in which technology integration will be applied must also be considered. Frameworks such as TPACK provide an applicable way to bridge the gap between theory and practice when it comes to technology integration in classrooms and identifies what teachers need to know to integrate technology successfully (Koehler, Shin, & Mishra, 2012, p. 24).

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Module 8:Technologies and Ethical Issues

Academic Dishonesty, Copyright, and Plagiarism:

Whilst technology integration has its advantages, there are certainly ethical issues related to copyright, plagiarism and misuse of information. Roblyer and Doering (2014, p. 29) identify ease of access to online information as a cause for academic dishonesty, enhanced by the ubiquitous nature of mobile technologies. The internet, although a rich resource of information, enables unethical practices when full-text documents and piracy software are readily available to students at the click of a button. In 2013, producers of the Dallas Buyers Club threatened legal action over the piracy of its film through Australian internet company iiNet (Birtles, 2014). This is where Gabriel (2010) argues that the boundary is blurred when it comes to ethical use.  A generation of students are simultaneously using technology to illegally obtain files whilst publishing academic work. Game of Thrones anyone? Digital file sharing, certainly enables plagiarism.

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Module 7: Web-Based Learning

Record in your blog some of the web-based resources that you may be able to use and how you will integrate them into your teaching.

The following web-based resources can be used as lesson enhancements (Roblyer & Doering, 2014, p. 260) across all disciplines, but are specifically considered for integration regarding my teaching areas of secondary HSIE and English.

Google Docs: Google Docs is a web-based word processor that enables group product development and serves as a collaborative online working tool. Students can electronically publish their work to create interpersonal exchanges and actively participate in their own learning (Roblyer & Doering, 2014, p. 261). This resource seems the most obvious choice for an English classroom, enabling development of literacy and digital literacies simultaneously. Suwantarathip and Wichadee (2014, p. 148) argue that the collaborative affordances of google docs enable development of students’ decision-making, problem-solving, conflict management and communication skills which are vital life skill outcomes.

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Module 6 (Part B): The Internet and the Classroom

Does your school/organisation have an Acceptable Use policy? Is it effective? Are there any issues with it?

There is one P – 12 college in the rural town where I live, so I have chosen to investigate their Acceptable Use Policy which is available for anyone to view on their school website. They have developed a social media policy based on recommendations from the Victorian Department of Education and Training and provide links to a step by step guide when responding to online incidents.

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